Summery peaches and cream scones

Make now, freeze and bake later treats!

When it’s hot out, meticulously incorporating butter into a flour mixture to make a biscuit or scone dough feels like just too much work, for me anyway. This recipe skips the butter, thanks to the inclusion of heavy cream – it’s the perfect alternative since that’s what butter’s made from, after all! I usually bake one disc (6 wedges) of scones when I make the dough and freeze the second one to bake later. If you’re looking for another freeze and bake scone recipe, I love this buttery rhubarb version.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups (360 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon (14 g) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon (5 g) kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup (67 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon (5 mL) vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) cold heavy cream, plus more for topping
  • 1 large ripe peace, diced (no need to peel)
  • Turbinado or sanding sugar
  • Room temperature butter, to serve

Method

  • Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  • If baking scones now, preheat oven to 425F (not necessary if you are freezing to bake later).
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar.
  • In a liquid measuring cup whisk together cream and vanilla extract. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the cream mixture. Use a large spoon or silicone spatula to gently combine into a shaggy dough, working just enough to incorporate all the flour without having a sticky dough. Add a few more drops of cream as needed.
  • Fold in the chopped peaches until evenly combined.
  • Place a sheet of parchment paper on your work surface and lightly dust it with flour OR lightly flour a clean counter. Divide the dough in half and gently pat each portion into a 6 or 7 inch (15 – 17.5 cm) circle about 3/4-inch (2 cm) thick.
  • Transfer the circles of dough to the prepared baking sheet. With a large, sharp knife, cut each circle into six evenly-sized wedges. Using your fingers or two forks, separate the cut wedges on the baking sheet there is about a one inch (2.5) gap between each one.
  • At this point you can place the unbaked scones in the freezer (on the baking sheet) and freeze until solid, about 90 minutes. Transfer to a storage container, with parchment under, between and on top of the discs, and store in freezer for up to six months.
  • Alternatively, if baking now, brush the tops of the scones with cream then sprinkle generously with turbinado or sanding sugar.
  • If baking immediately, it will take 12-14 minutes, until golden brown all over. If your oven has uneven heat, rotate the pan once during baking.
  • If baking from frozen, remove the scones from the freezer while the oven preheats to 425F and place on a parchment-lined baking tray. Brush the tops of the scones with cream then sprinkle generously with turbinado or sanding sugar. Bake 16-18 minutes, until golden brown all over. If your oven has uneven heat, rotate the pan once during baking.
  • Remove from the oven and allow to rest for just a few minutes before serving warm with butter.
  • Store leftover scones in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. Freeze, well-wrapped, for up to two weeks.
  • Scones can be reheated for about 10 minutes at 325F on a baking tray, covered loosely with foil.

Makes 12 large scones.

Author: Paula Roy

Welcome to my kitchen! I love simple dishes prepared with passion and am always seeking to find new methods to make food as fun and flavourful as possible. If you enjoy this space be sure to check out my Rogers TV Ottawa cooking show, Paula Roy's Favourite Foods, available on local cable, streaming and a dedicated playlist on Rogers TV's YouTube channel.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.